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Peter L. Thompson, DDS Blog

Looking for a New Dentist in Portales? Here are some Tips for Choosing

June 3, 2021

woman at computer, searching for a new dentist in Portales, NM

Have you moved to the area and you’re now looking for a new dentist in Portales or any nearby areas across New Mexico, West Texas, Colorado, and Oklahoma? Scrolling through page after page, calling office after office can be frustrating. Some people may get so frustrated that they put off choosing a new dentist until they have a dental emergency. We’ve put some quick tips together to help you find the right dentist.

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5 Reasons to Not Put Off Dental Implants

You need a dental implant, but you are reluctant to get started. Dr. Peter Thompson and his team in Portales, NM understand that there is some hesitation, and let’s face it, life gets in the way. However, here is a list of reasons as to why you shouldn’t wait

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Don’t Eat That: A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Mouth

April 27, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Patient Care — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:11 am

Some foods will help you grow healthy teeth and keep them forever. Some foods will prevent you from growing healthy teeth, or harm the ones you already have. You can grow and maintain strong, healthy teeth by eating a diet that your mouth (and your body) will truly love. But do you know what foods to avoid for a healthy mouth? Peter L. Thompson, DDS would like to share that information with you today!

Diet is Everything

The word “diet” has earned a bad reputation over the years as a verb that means eating less to lose weight, but diet is also a noun and a powerful way you can give yourself the best life possible. Your diet is simply the food you eat, and most of us are trying our best to eat wholesome food with just a few sweet treats here and there. 

Good food sets the stage for a healthy life. Nutrition is vital for growing healthy muscles and bones. And guess what—your teeth are bones, too! Good nutrition helps your body fight infections that cause decay and disease in your mouth and the rest of your body. Not only will a healthy diet help you have more energy, a better attention span, and the strength to enjoy your life, but it also promotes good oral health, too. Dairy, meat, nuts, fresh fruits and vegetables can all support healthy teeth and gums. But what should you avoid?

Foods that Promote Decay

Some of the foods and beverages that cause the most tooth decay:

  • Sugary sodas and juice
  • Sugary cocktails and coffees
  • Sugary sweets like candy and baked goods
  • Processed food lacking important nutrients (protein, phosphorus, calcium, and vitamins A, B, C, and D)

Foods that Damage Tooth Enamel 

The hard, white surface of your teeth is your enamel. Enamel protects the nerves at the core of your tooth and helps your teeth stay strong and healthy. Some foods really hurt the surfaces of your teeth by causing dangerous buildup, or by putting too much force on the enamel and damaging it. Some foods that can damage your enamel include:

  • Popcorn kernels
  • Ice
  • Coffee and tea with added sugar
  • Citrus (lemon juice)
  • Alcohol (which causes dry mouth) 
  • Sugary juice, soda, sports drinks, and cocktails
  • Sticky, chewy or hard candy 
  • Dried fruit

It’s probably not surprising that sugar makes the “bad list” in both categories. You don’t have to avoid sugar completely, but it’s probably best to pick your favorite treat and just stick with that in moderation.

Love Your Mouth

If you eat a healthy diet and practice good oral hygiene, your teeth will love and serve you forever. By brushing and flossing every day and visiting the dentist for a checkup and cleaning twice a year, you can best avoid tooth decay and damage. 

Make an appointment with Portales dentist Peter L. Thompson, DDS to give your smile a fighting chance with a healthy diet and regular dental care.

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Can Plaque Cause Tooth Loss?

April 13, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Dental Health — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:11 am

If you’ve ever gone too long between brushing your teeth, you know how slimy and dirty your teeth can feel. Some people lovingly call this layer of grime “teeth sweaters.” But it has a real name: plaque. Plaque is common but it can cause poor oral health if you ignore it. Read below for more information on what plaque is and how to deal with it.

What is Plaque?
To best understand what exactly plaque is, let us paint you a picture of the inside of your mouth after a meal. After enjoying your delicious food, someone else (or something else) is enjoying the leftovers. Oral bacteria are natural and normally present in everyone’s mouth. 

These bacteria feed off tiny bits of leftover food on your teeth – kind of gross, but it’s true! As bacteria eat the food, they digest and process it. Finally, the bacteria produce plaque as an aftereffect of digestion. This process happens with any food you eat, but the bacteria especially love carbohydrates and sugar. 

Plaque sticks to any and all parts of your teeth. In fact, the plaque on the sides of your teeth and near your gums can be different than the kind of plaque found in the grooves on the chewing surface of your teeth. 

Effects of Plaque on Teeth

The real problem with plaque is that it contains acid, which ruins your teeth. Over time, acid can erode your enamel and harm your gums. While plaque is totally normal, it’s still important to keep it at bay. 

The buildup of plaque can cause:

  • Tartar
  • Gum disease
  • Cavities
  • Eroded enamel
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Bad breath

In summary, plaque is the basis of most oral health problems. Left untreated, many of the oral health problems listed above can lead to tooth loss and other oral health complications down the road.

What Causes Plaque?

You can’t avoid plaque completely. Plaque is simply the natural outcome of oral bacteria. Either the bacteria naturally reproduce or you pick up new bacteria from your environment. And some oral bacteria are actually good for you. 

So the idea isn’t to completely get rid of bacteria in your mouth. But certain foods (like sugar) and bad habits (like not brushing and flossing) can cause excessive plaque and harmful buildup that hardens into tartar and can wreak havoc on your oral health.

Fighting Plaque

The benefits of good oral hygiene go far beyond just your mouth. A healthy mouth is important for a healthy body and a joyful life. 

To keep your mouth healthy and plaque-free:

  • Brush your teeth for two minutes twice every day, especially in the morning and before bed. Saliva helps wash food off your teeth, but you have less saliva while you sleep, so it’s important to go to bed with very clean teeth to give the bacteria less to enjoy. Also, be sure to replace your toothbrush every three months to keep it clean.
  • Floss and clean between your teeth every day. A lot of plaque hides along and under the gum line, and flossing is the only way to get to this hard-to-reach plaque that brushing will miss.
  • Mouthwash can help loosen up plaque before or after you brush your teeth, and most have ingredients to fight bacteria. You might be sensitive to mouthwash and mouthwash should never replace regular brushing and flossing, so talk to your dentist about using it.
  • Eat less sugar. Especially avoid sugary drinks, which prolong your mouth’s exposure to sugar all day. Sugar is sneaky, you might be surprised how many snacks and beverages actually contain it. If you do have snacks with sugar, rinse your mouth with water right afterward.
  • Eat fewer snacks between meals. If you eat all day long, it’s like giving the bacteria in your mouth an all-day buffet. Eat a healthy meal, then either rinse your mouth or brush your teeth, then give your mouth a break from the plaque process.
  • See your Portales dentist. You can do a lot to fight bacteria and plaque every day, but professional cleaning is still necessary at least twice a year.
  • Ask your dentist about dental sealants for an added layer of protection against plaque and tooth decay.

To schedule a professional cleaning for your teeth, or to develop a new relationship with your Portales dentist, contact Peter L. Thompson, DDS today! Dr. Thompson is taking new patients and would love to serve all your oral health needs, and help you keep plaque at bay.

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Dentists Are Doctors, Too!

March 27, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Dental News — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:47 am

There are many kinds of doctors—Doctors of English, Doctors of Philosophy, Doctors of Medicine, Dr. Pepper… (wink). Of course, when we use the term doctor, we most often mean a physician or Doctor of Medicine. But did you know that dentists are doctors, too? Every doctor has a specialty, and a dentist’s specialty is oral health.

Dr. Peter Thompson, your Portales dentist explains how dentistry is a specific branch of medicine, and what it all means for the link between oral health and overall wellness.

Dentists are Doctors

Dentists are every bit as trained and educated as physicians. They have the same general education in science as physicians before they get clinical training in dentistry. This background education helps dentists look at you—the whole package—when taking care of your teeth.

Dentists are specialists in the science and mechanics of oral health, which extends to your head, face, and neck (the craniofacial region)—important parts of your body! Your oral health is an MVP when it comes to overall health and wellness, and dentists are just as important as other doctors when it comes to total body health.

The Oral-Systemic Link

Have you ever had your whole printer jam because one tiny piece of paper is out of line? It’s endlessly frustrating and time-consuming, and a reminder that machines require all parts, big and small, to be in good shape to get the job done. You are not a printer, but you are made of countless cells, organs, muscles, and bones that all work together to make you human and allow you to survive and be healthy. 

Dentists look at your mouth, gums, and teeth, but they also look at your jaw (TMJ), face, head, and neck, keeping an eye out for signs of a problem such as swelling, discoloration, and more. Often times, dentists also perform tissue biopsies, diagnose illnesses, and screen for high blood pressure and oral cancer. Dentists can tell just by the look of your mouth if you might have other health issues like stress, chronic inflammation or poor quality of sleep.

Time and time again, doctors, dentists, and researchers come together to find important overlaps in medicine and dentistry. We call these overlaps “the oral-systemic link.” There are already many studies about oral health links to diabetes and heart conditions.

Seeing the dentist regularly is important in assessing your risks for health conditions all over your body. For example, respected family physician Bradley Bale says: “Periodontal disease is a medical disease with a dental solution.” Periodontal disease is advanced gum disease that’s linked to other chronic and acute illnesses like cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and more. The best dentists and physicians will insist on working together to help you reach your optimal health.

Good oral hygiene and regular dentist visits accomplish much more than just polish your pearly whites. Everything from eating and sleeping to working and playing depends on a healthy smile. The healthier your mouth is, the healthier and happier your whole life will be.

Choose a dentist who asks questions about your personal goals for life and health. Ask them about their views on whole body dentistry that works toward your wellness as one, big, interconnected machine.

If you’re ready to take care of your health from top to bottom, make an appointment with us at Peter L. Thompson, DDS today!

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Can Poor Oral Health Cause Diabetes?

March 13, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Dental Health,Diabetes — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:37 am

Diabetes is a chronic and complicated disease that affects how your body processes sugar—its main source of energy. Diabetes symptoms mostly affect your heart, eyes, nerves, and kidneys, but it can affect your whole body, including your mouth.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), more than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and almost 2 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Managing your blood sugar is very important if you have diabetes and will help keep symptoms at bay. Taking good care of your oral wellness is actually one key to managing blood sugar.

Diabetes & Your Mouth 

Diabetes can show itself in your mouth by causing:

  • Gum disease: This condition is surprisingly common among most adults and has an even stronger correlation with diabetes, but it can and should be treated.
  • Dry mouth: Diabetes tends to cause a decrease in saliva, which can be uncomfortable and cause bad breath.
  • Decreased ability to taste: Diabetes can make it difficult to fully taste and enjoy your food. Try new spices to improve your meals, but be careful not to use too much sugar.
  • Oral infections: Yeast (thrush) is especially common because diabetes affects your immune system. People with dentures and diabetes are at an increased risk of developing oral infections.
  • Slow healing: Diabetes can affect your ability to recover from injury and illness. Cold sores or cuts in your mouth may stick around longer if you have diabetes.

Gum Disease & Diabetes

You’d be absolutely shocked at the high number of bacteria that live in your mouth every day. Most of them are totally normal and fine. But, certain types of bacteria can be bad for your oral health and overall health. 

Since bacteria live off the sugars in your mouth, people with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing gum disease from the bad bacteria. In fact, 22% of people diagnosed with diabetes will also get gum disease. In turn, gum disease infections can cause your blood sugar to elevate, which is the exact opposite of what you want. Thankfully, treating gum disease has been shown to also treat high blood sugar.

Gum disease is common and treatable and can vary in severity from a minor inflammation with sore and bleeding gums, to a major issue of receding gums, pus surrounding the teeth, and eventual tooth loss. If you have diabetes, it’s important to keep an eye on your oral health and practice good hygiene to prevent gum disease from starting or getting worse. Gum disease is linked to a number of other health problems, so you really don’t want to ignore any signs that it might be developing.

Prevention & Protection

The ADA recommends controlling your blood sugar, brushing and flossing your teeth, and seeing the dentist in order to protect your mouth from symptoms of diabetes. Controlling gum disease and practicing great oral hygiene is known to help manage diabetes.

If you’re looking for a dentist in Portales, make an appointment at Peter L. Thompson, DDS today!

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Hot on the Trail with Oral Pathology

February 27, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Dental Health,Dental Services — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:33 am

When it comes to your oral health, we hope you never have any pains or problems. Good preventive care will help you always feel your best! But even with the best habits, dental problems do happen. In that case, oral pathology is the science and medicine that helps diagnose and treat whatever is making you ache. If you think you have oral disease, don’t be embarrassed, but get help as soon as possible.

What is Oral Pathology?

Sometimes things go wrong, even in the healthiest people. If you have pain, bleeding, or unusual symptoms in your mouth, oral pathology helps us find the answers you need.

According to the American Dental Association: “Oral pathology is the specialty of dentistry and discipline of pathology that deals with the nature, identification, and management of diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions.” In other words, oral pathology is the science that understands the causes and effects of these diseases. Common practices include clinical examinations, lab testing, and taking the whole body health and chemistry into consideration.

Pathology is important because if you have a certain problem, we want to know exactly what it is so that we can offer the right treatment. For example, viruses and bacteria are completely different kinds of organisms. Both can make you sick, but in order to get the proper treatment, we want to know what exactly is causing the problem. 

For example, let’s say at your last checkup, Peter L. Thompson, DDS noticed your gums bled more than usual and have started to recede. These are early warning signs of gingivitis and gum disease. But why now? Your gums have been healthy for your whole life. After a brief discussion, we rule out any dietary, hygiene or lifestyle changes. But you are taking a new medication – a medication that is known to cause dry mouth, a common risk factor for gum disease. Aha! And there we have it. Oral pathology has done it again!

Oral pathology takes into consideration your personal health background to consider what existing medical conditions might be affecting you specifically. This is why it’s a great idea to have a good relationship with your Portales dentist that includes sharing any and all health problems and medications – even if you think they don’t have anything to do with your mouth. Your oral health and your overall health go hand-in-hand!

Oral Diseases

According to the World Health Organization: “Risk factors for oral diseases include an unhealthy diet, tobacco use, harmful alcohol use, poor oral hygiene, and social determinants.” Any of these combined with your personal risk factors can make you and your mouth unhealthy.

The main categories of oral diseases are:

  • Pain: Any number of problems can cause pain in your mouth, jaw, and neck.
  • Infections: Can be caused by fungus, bacteria, or viruses.
  • Cancer: Warning signs include a discolored tongue or gums, open wounds, or lumps in your mouth or throat.
  • Cavities: Called dental caries, lead to tooth decay and other complications.
  • Gum Disease: A common but treatable infection and inflammation of the gums.
  • Tooth Loss: Many oral diseases can cause tooth loss. Your Portales dentist can treat the problem and also talk with you about tooth replacement options.

Anything that prevents you from comfortably speaking, smiling, chewing, and swallowing is an oral problem. While accidents and injuries aren’t diseases, but they can certainly harm your oral health.

A healthy mouth is key for a healthy body and a happy life. The best way to protect your oral health is through good oral hygiene and healthy lifestyle habits. This includes:

  • Brushing your teeth twice a day, for two minutes
  • Flossing or cleaning between your teeth once every day
  • Seeing the dentist regularly, usually two times per year
  • Eating a healthy diet and avoiding/limiting smoking, sugar, and alcohol
  • Drinking lots of water and getting good sleep
  • Understanding how your overall health affects your oral health

If you’re experiencing any oral health problems and are wondering why we would love to help you find answers. Contact Peter L. Thompson, DDS today to make an appointment if you have any concerns about your oral health!

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Dentistry in the Digital Age

February 13, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Dental Services — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:21 am

Technology has changed nearly every aspect of human life and modern society. New tools, programs, and education can greatly improve your healthcare, too! Let’s say you need any kind of standard dental restoration for a cracked or missing tooth. From x-rays and impressions to surgery and installation, your whole treatment could be digital. We’re so used to digital tools these days, you may not even notice how much technology a dentist can utilize to best serve your oral health needs. Below are some of the ways your oral care may be digitized.

CAD/CAM Software

Short for computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing, this software brings you better-fitting crowns, veneers, inlays and onlays, and bridges. CAD/CAM technology comes out of industrial engineering and manufacturing and into the dental office to provide faster, superior products and services in oral health. Using computers to design oral appliances increases accuracy, efficiency, appearance, and function. 

CAD/CAM dental services start with 3D images. The computer takes the images and creates a model of whatever restorative appliance you need. Research shows that dental restorations made with CAD/CAM technology are stronger and less likely to break. This is great news if you’re already dealing with oral health issues and you just want everything to look natural and work well.

Same-Day Milling
Thanks to CAD/CAM technology, you can now get many dental restorations placed in just one visit to the dental office. This is good news for busy people! All crowns, veneers, and onlays need to actually be created and shaped out of porcelain or composite. After using digital images to get a picture of your mouth, the information will be sent to a machine that can automatically create a natural-looking restoration on the spot. 

The machine can usually make these in about 20 minutes. The milling machine may also glaze or stain the porcelain to best match your natural teeth. Like clay pottery, the porcelain or composite then needs to be fired. All of this should take anywhere from one to two hours. You can walk into the dentist toothless and walk out with a full, vibrant smile the same day. 

Guided Surgery
Surgical guides are 3D computer images that your dentist may use to improve the accuracy and safety of having dental implants placed. Not everyone is a good candidate for implants, but if your dentist believes you are, they may also use a surgical guide during your procedure. 

A surgical guide uses digital images to give us a realistic picture of your jawbones, gums, nerves, and more. A computer will help your Portales dentist plan the whole procedure so that each step and measurement is more accurate. With all of this important information, dentists can work faster so you’re in the chair less (as much as we love to see you).

Cone-Beam Imaging

When your doctor or dentist needs to see beyond the naked eye, they can use one of many different x-ray and imaging technologies. Cone-beam images are 3D scans that use cone-shaped laser beams to get a complete scan of your entire mouth. Cone beams use more radiation than a standard dental x-ray, but far less than a standard medical CT scan. Cone-beam images especially help with placement and installation of dental implants.  

Electronic Booking & Billing

Gone are the days of endless stacks of paper you need to keep track of and store. Gone are the days of being on hold with a receptionist. Many dental offices now make use of email and online programs to communicate with patients both for billing and making new appointments. 

Now, everything you need to know about your oral care can be kept in one place to easily see and understand. Nothing can replace the friendly and professional environment of a good dental office, but digital communication helps ensure that you, your dentist, and the insurance providers are all on the same page. So when you walk in for your appointment, things should flow seamlessly and with no surprises.

Finding a Digital Dentist

An everyday visit to the dentist looks a lot different today than it has in decades past. The services you need may require any or all of the above technology to provide quality care and favorable outcomes. 

At Peter L. Thompson, DDS, we are always learning more about how to use technology to better serve you. Make an appointment today to learn more about what we can do for you and your smile!

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Biofilm: The Most Important Film of the Year

January 27, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Dental Services — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:30 am

Biofilm is quite literally a “film” or layer of biological matter that forms on teeth, in sink pipes, on river rocks, and more. Biofilm is made of many different things. Think of it as concrete, which contains cement as well as a slew of other materials. It’s likely you’ve been aware of biofilm on your teeth when they feel slimy or fuzzy instead of smooth and clean. Dr. Peter Thompson, Portales dentist explains more below about biofilm and the role it plays in your oral wellness.

My Teeth Aren’t Cold, Why Do They Need Sweaters?

It’s true; the texture of biofilm can feel like fuzzy little sweaters on your teeth. Biofilm occurs when bacteria stick to a wet environment, creating a slimy layer of microorganisms and random debris. Biofilm is a diverse and highly organized group of biological matter all webbed together. Some of the microorganisms are neutral but some are pathogenic and cause a lot of problems for your oral and overall health.

This slimy layer includes multiple kinds of bacteria, fungi, and anything else that gets stuck in the stickiness such as plaque or leftover food particles. Usually, bacteria start off floating around on their own, but if they stick to a wet surface they can cause a microcolony and produce a lot of gunk. This can happen on your teeth as easily as down a water pipe.

The Effects of Biofilm

It’s proven that not all microorganisms in biofilm cause harm to your oral health. But the ones that do can cause inflammation and deterioration in the bones and tissues of your mouth and have a direct pathway through the gums and into the bloodstream.

Biofilm in your mouth can cause:

  • Tooth decay
  • Gum disease
  • Cavities
  • Tooth loss

Dental plaque is a dangerous kind of biofilm. Without properly cleaning your teeth (brushing and flossing every day), the material can corrode your teeth and the bacteria can make you sick.

Gingivitis is a common and mild irritation of the gums. But even 30-40% of the population will have severe gum disease called periodontitis. A dentist can help you look for signs of gum disease or diagnose it.

Biofilm allowed to travel through the bloodstream to other parts of your body cause:

  • Ear infections
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Diabetes
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Cystic fibrosis (lung infection)
  • Legionnaire’s Disease

Treating Biofilm & Tooth Decay

The formation of biofilm actually protects the bacteria in it by keeping it attached to teeth and other debris. This makes the bacteria hard to clear and kill. Regular brushing and flossing are essential for your oral health to prevent bacteria and other microorganisms from building up on your teeth.

However, some buildup of plaque and tartar is common and can only be treated by a dental professional. This is why getting your teeth cleaned at the dentist twice a year is so important. Biofilm can also grow on oral appliances. So, if you use dentures, a mouthguard, or a removable bridge, ask your dentist how to best keep the appliance clean.

If biofilm causes excessive tartar buildup, your dentist may recommend special treatment to remove it and kill the bacteria such as prescription mouthwash or more advanced periodontal treatments. Unfortunately, oral infections are chronic because the bacteria can’t be completely killed by antibiotics. Oral infections must be inspected and treated on an ongoing basis. As always—prevention is the best medicine.

If you’re looking for a dental professional to keep your mouth and overall health in tiptop shape, Peter L. Thompson, DDS is accepting new patients. Contact us to make an appointment today!

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Can I Recycle My Toothbrush?

January 13, 2021

Filed under: Blog,Patient Care — Tags: — Dr Peter Thompson @ 11:14 am

Take a look around your bathroom and you’re likely to see a lot of products in plastic packaging. Paper boxes and toilet paper rolls are easily recycled in your bin at home, but what about the tricky stuff like toothpaste tubes and toothbrushes? Your Portales dentist Dr. Peter Thompson has the answers!

Toothbrush Recycling

That’s right, you CAN recycle your toothbrush! (As well as old tubes of toothpaste.) The plastic in toothbrushes can be reused in nearly anything from lawn furniture to plastic containers. The hard part is separating the different materials in the toothbrush – plastic handles, nylon bristles, and metal to hold the bristles in place.

Why Recycle?

We recommend you switch out your old toothbrush every three months or after an illness. This ensures your toothbrush is clean and bacteria free, and that the bristles are in the best shape to actually clean your teeth.

While good for your oral health, consuming four toothbrushes every year is not great for our limited resources on this beautiful planet we call Earth. You don’t have to be a total hippie to care about reducing waste, and thoughtfully getting rid of ANYTHING, including old toothbrushes or toothpaste tubes, can be really simple and make an impact on sustainability.

How to Recycle

There are a number of ways you can go green with your oral hygiene routine. First and foremost, consider buying toothbrushes already made of recycled materials. Buying products made from recycled materials is an important part of the recycling cycle. You can easily recycle the simple stuff like cardboard boxes and plastic mouthwash bottles right from home.

As for recycling your toothbrush or tricky toothpaste tubes, you either need to disassemble and clean them yourself before dropping them off at a center, or you can mail them to a company that will prepare them for you. Be sure to check the packaging to see what kind of plastic they are made of. You can find recycling centers by searching online, Earth911.com is a helpful resource. Call your local center to make sure they accept the kind of plastic you have.

Companies that take toothbrushes and toothpaste tubes in the mail include Colgate, Tom’s of Maine, and Preserve (though Preserve only accepts their own toothbrushes). Both Colgate and Tom’s of Maine partner with a larger company called TerraCycle which recycles nearly everything.

Your Portales dentist, Dr. Thompson believes in caring for your oral health as well as the environment. Contact Peter L. Thompson, DDS today for an appointment if you’re looking for a professional local dentist to take care of your smile!

The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

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